Driver’s education should be taught in schools

By Emma Barhoumi
Staff Writer

If a person in Georgia is under the age of 18, to get their Class D driver’s license in Georgia, they must take a required certified drivers education course, have at least 40 hours supervised driving time and drive for 6 hours during the night. The class is available online or the person can go into a facility to take the course.

In 2007, a law called Joshua’s Law was passed, implementing new driver’s education requirements for teens before they can receive a Class D driver’s license. As mentioned above, teenagers trying to get a license must have a minimum of 40 hours of supervised behind-the-wheel training, with 6 hours of these 40 at night. These rules came as a result of Joshua’s Law. The bill was named after Joshua Brown, an 18-year-old boy who was killed in a car crash after his vehicle hydroplaned in a puddle of water. Joshua hit a tree because he didn’t know what to do when his car hydroplaned and he lost control. The bill ensures teens to be aware of how to handle common situations while driving and prevent any more tragic accidents like Joshua’s.

A drivers education course is required to receive a Class D drivers licence, yet many schools don’t offer it as a class. I believe all schools in Georgia should offer this course free of charge because if you cannot afford to pay the fee to take the class online or at a facility, by law you can’t get a license. If schools offered drivers ed as an elective, than kids who wanted their license would have the option to take the class in high school. In addition, it would help students reach that desired 40 hour mark.

Many schools all over the United States do offer a drivers education course as an elective and have trained professionals to teach the teens. An alternative to adding a drivers education class to the school is forming business partnerships with local drivers education courses to ensure that students can learn to drive properly at a low price.

Get your license today!

 

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